WSU CAHNRS

College of Agricultural, Human, and Natural Resource Sciences

Master of Science in Agriculture

Courses

The online courses listed below are the MS in Agriculture (MSAG) program approved courses. They are delivered via web-based learning formats. Delivery is flexible, so in most cases students can take courses while maintaining career and personal responsibilities. Other courses* not listed below can be used on a MSAG student’s program of study as long as the courses can be justified and are approved by the student’s committee and the MSAG Director.

*Pullman students have additional face-to-face course options available to them on the WSU campus not listed below.

Long Term Course Schedule 

Note:  Courses and Schedules are subject to change.

Course descriptions:

Agriculture
Agricultural Education
Agricultural and Food Systems
Animal Science
Crop Science
Economic Sciences
Engineering Management
Entomology
Food Sciences
Horticulture
Human Development
Natural Resource Sciences
Philosophy
Plant Pathology
Soil Sciences
Statistics

Agriculture

  • AGRI 562 – Advanced Topics Credits V 1-3 | May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 4 hours. Directed group study of selected advanced topics in agriculture and related areas.
  • AGRI 587 – Research in Agriculture REQUIRED CORE COURSE Credits 3 | Exploration and assessment of current issues associated with domestic and international agriculture programs.
    • This course will focus on ways to effectively communicate research and extension information to diverse audiences and to plan and assess effective extension programs. During the first part of the semester we will practice communicating to research audiences in the form of scientific papers and presentations. We will then compare the writing style used in scientific writing to that used in communicating extension information. The final part of the semester will concentrate on program planning, evaluation, and the use of the Logic Model in extension.
  • AGRI 700 – Master’s Research, Thesis, and/or Examination REQUIRED CORE COURSE (Thesis Option)  Credits Variable S, F grading.
  • AGRI 702 – Master’s Special Problems, Directed Study, and/or Examination REQUIRED CORE COURSE (Non-Thesis Option)  Credits Variable S, F grading.

Agricultural Education

  • AG ED 5__  Methods of Technological Change  Credits 3 | Course in development
  • AG_ED 508 Foundations of Vocational Education  Credits 3 | Historical, philosophical, social, political and economic factors that influence education in vocational environments.

Agricultural and Food Systems

  • AFS 302 – [M] Introduction to Agroecology Credits 3 | Agroecological crop production through case study analyses and applications of ecological principles in traditional and modern farming systems. (Crosslisted course offered as SOIL SCI 302, AFS 302). Recommended preparation: SOILS SCI 201
    • This course is designed as an introductory agroecology course.  It will blend basic principles of ecology (including species interactions, population dynamics, disturbance, succession, natural selection, genetic and species diversity and stability, etc.) with current issues in agricultural systems (including soil quality, weed control, pest and disease management, genetic diversity, etc.).  Case studies will focus on modern and traditional farming systems where the use of agroecological concepts and practices has improved the overall economic, social, and environmental sustainability of these farming systems.  Agroecological design will be addressed in relationship to potential improvements in the sustainability of many of our current methods of agricultural production
  • AFS 501 – Current Research in Organic and Sustainable Agriculture  Credits 3 | Multidisciplinary framework to assess the sustainability of a range of farming and food systems.
  • AFS 545 – Field Analysis of Sustainable Food Systems Credits 3 | Experiential course visiting farms, food processing and marketing facilities to develop understanding of issues and relationships of sustainable food systems.  Offered at 400 and 500 level.
    • Experiential, interdisciplinary course learning about food and agriculture systems in Washington State through readings, online discussions and a week-long field component. During our spring break trip, we will visit a diverse spectra of relevant crop research programs, farms, food processing, distribution and marketing facilities.

Animal Science

  • ANIM_SCI 501 – Milk, Meat, and Methane: Contemporary Animal Production Issues Credits 3 | Provides knowledge and understanding of livestock issues that affect contemporary livestock production.  Not currently taught

Crop Science

  • CROP_SCI 360 – [I] World Agricultural Systems Credits 3 | Prerequisites: Two semesters physical or biological sciences. Study of agro-environmental characteristics of world agriculture; historical and contemporary features of world food production. (Crosslisted course offered as CROP SCI 360, SOIL SCI 360).
    • This is an upper-level survey course exploring the interactions between agriculture and human societies (past and present). It includes historical discussions of the world’s major food crops and farming methods, current agricultural systems on our planet, the role that climate and soils play in agricultural systems, and how agriculture and the rest of our environment interact. We also try to connect all of this to each of our lives today. Other than expecting some basic science background (completion of two semesters in either college level physical or biological sciences), the course is geared to ALL folks, both those with and without agriculture or science backgrounds.
  • CROP_SCI 443 Plant Breeding for Organic Agriculture Credits 3 | Course Prerequisite: HORT 202; BIOLOGY 106 or 120. Concepts and practice of breeding in and for organic agriculture with an emphasis on field-based, on-farm techniques.
    • This class will allow students to gain skills for performing classical plant breeding methods, under organic cropping systems in the field, for a wide range of crop plants in temperate climates. Through discovering the traits and challenges important in organic systems it is possible to envision breeding crops that will excel under organic systems. Our discussions will consider sources of diverse crop genetic materials, screening methodology, breeding techniques, population dynamics, maintaining genetic diversity, disease resistance, crop genetic purity and releasing varieties. Examples of Participatory Plant Breeding projects performed by regional farmers under field conditions will be reviewed. Students will be expected to develop a breeding program model for a regionally adapted crop that will include all of the elements of plant breeding theory for organic systems that are covered in the class.
  • CROP_SCI 480 – Plant Genomics and Biotechnology Credits 3 | Prerequisites: BIOLOGY 420 Advanced concepts in plant genomics and biotechnology with emphasis on approaches, techniques, and application. (Crosslisted course offered as HORT 480 and CROP SCI 480). Recommended preparation: MBIOS 301 or CROP SCI 445.
    • The goal of Plant Genomics and Biotechnology is to develop an understanding of the genetics, genomics, and biotechnology of horticultural crop plants, and the ways in which this information can be utilized for crop improvement. This will be accomplished through a survey of plant genomics and biotechnology, along with the investigation of current methods, approaches and techniques. The course will be comprised of reading assignments, online quiz and threaded class discussions. It is expected that students registering for this course have an understanding of the basics of plant physiology and molecular biology.
  • CROP_SCI 5__ – Weed Management Credits 2 | Course in development

Economic Sciences

  • ECONS 505 – Economics for Agricultural Decision Making Credits 3 | This is a course in managerial economics skills with specific applications to agricultural issues. It is designed to provide a working knowledge of the economy and to develop basic skills in economic analysis for managerial decision making. The course introduces the tools and analytical approaches used by economists to evaluate problems and to develop strategic responses, and includes extensive applications to agricultural issues.
    • Agriculture is possibly the society’s most foundational industry. What could be more fundamental than the need for food and clothing? These basic goods are produced using limited resources and thus food and clothing come in limited supply. When a good is limited, we must decided how to distribute it to meet the boundless desires of consumers, the people who want to eat food and wear clothes. In this course we will look at the how consumers act upon their preference to meet their self-interest given their limited means by examining such topics as utility, income and substitution effects, and demand response to price changes, among other topics. We will discuss the producer’s (e.g. the farmer’s) decision regarding which inputs are best used to produce the best output, and how producer know which output is best. This will include a variety of topics like the production possibilities frontier, profit-maximization, production costs, and marginal costs and benefits. We will want to know how these two force supply (from the producer) and demand (from the consumer) come together to create the rationing mechanism commonly referred to as “the market” and its most important signal–price. Finally, we will see how these forces are influenced by and play a role in the broader world, the national and international economy. Such topics as the national income, international trade, financial markets, and the role of government will be discussed.

Engineering Management

E_M courses are online, but lectures are delivered synchronous generally at 5:15pm Pacific Standard Time.  Inasmuch as there are also recordings available, there are no exceptions to deadlines, online discussions, team projects, homework, or whatever else the instructor requires.  Any student who this presents a challenge for should contact the instructor in advance of enrolling for the course.

  • E_M 501 – Management of Organizations Credits 3 | Exploration of issues related to individual behavior in work organizations, including motivation, leadership, team-building, and team management skills.
  • E_M 522 – Supervision and Leadership for Engineering and Technology Managers Credits 3 | Strategies of supervision with practical application techniques presented to create individual and organizational motivation.
  • E_M 564 – Project Management Credits 3 | Technical tools, Critical Path Method (CPM), Program Evaluation Review Technique (PERT), cost/schedule control systems, behavioral issues and organizational structure. Credit not granted for both E_M 464 and E_M 564.

Entomology

  • ENTOM 351 –  Ecological and Integrated Pest Management Credits 3 | Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 106, 107, or 120. Philosophy, ecological foundation, tactics, and strategies of ecologically-based and integrated pest management.
  • IPM 552 – Pesticides and the Environment Credits 3 | Prerequisites: 12 credits of biology-based coursework. Immediate and prolonged effects of pesticides on human and other animals; legal and moral repercussions of pesticide use.  Offered at 400 and 500 level.
    • This course provides an overview of pesticide use, with particular emphasis on unintended resultant environmental effects.  The course also reviews all types of pesticides from an overall perspective relative to their utilization and/or occurrence in agricultural and non-agricultural ecosystems.  Course content emphasizes factors that must be considered in making decisions to utilize pesticides, including state and federal legal requirements.
  • ENTOM 555 – Agricultural Chemical Technology for Crop Protection & Production Credits 3 | Mechanistic examination of agricultural chemical technology; synthetic and biological pesticides and fertilizers; mechanism of biological activity; deployment; management.
    • The course will focus first on the context of the ecology of agricultural systems that necessitate intervention with crop protection technologies. The deployment of crop protection technologies will be examined within the context of an integrated pest management strategy for decision making. Because crop health is one form of enhancing pest control, the course will necessarily cover fertilizer technology and its efficient application to avoid unnecessary nitrogen and phosphorus losses. Following several lectures that provide the context for deployment of agricultural chemical technologies, specific types of pest control products will be introduced and discussed from the perspective of how they work. Pesticides approved for agriculture in general and for certified organic agriculture specifically will be broadly covered. In addition, attention will be given to the use of genetic engineering to enhance crop protection. The main focus of all discussions will be mechanistic: what is the physicochemical or biological nature of the technology, how does it work from a biological perspective, how is it deployed, and how should it be best managed for environmental protection and perhaps as importantly, sustainable use of the technology.

Food Science

  • FS 504-02 Food Engineering Review Credits 1 | No course prerequisites. Students will learn engineering concepts as applied to food production on an industrial scale. This includes: mass and energy balances, fluid flow, steam properties, heat transfer, mass transfer, psychometrics, refrigeration, and drying. Offered Spring 2017, future TBD.
  • FS 509 – Principles of Environmental Toxicology Credits 3 |  Recommended Preparation: Biol 102 or Biol 115, Chem 111, Chem 112, Chem 275, and Stat 251. Fundamental toxicological concepts including dose-response relationships, absorption of toxicants, distribution and storage of toxicants, biotransformation and elimination of toxicants, target organ toxicity and teratogenesis, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis; chemodynamics of environmental contaminants including transport, fate, and receptors; chemicals of environmental interest and how they are tested and regulated; risk assessment fundamentals.  Offered at 400 and 500 level. Students registering for FS 509 are required to prepare an additional in-depth report.  [UI Coop Course]
    • Environmental toxicology is the study of the nature, properties, effects and detection of toxic substances in the environment and in any environmentally exposed species, including humans. This course will provide a general understanding of toxicology related to the environment. Fundamental toxicological concepts will be covered including dose‐response relationships, absorption of toxicants, distribution and storage of toxicants, biotransformation and elimination of toxicants, target organ toxicity and teratogenesis, mutagenesis, carcinogenesis and risk assessment. The course will include an overview of chemodynamics of contaminants in the environment including fate and transport. The course will examine chemicals of environmental interest and how they are tested and regulated. Case studies and special topics will be critically reviewed.
  • FS 510 – Functional Foods and Health Credits 3 | Recommended preparation: Biol 101; Biol 102, or Biol 106; Mbios 303. Benefits of food beyond basic nutrition; bioactive compounds in functional foods and nutraceuticals relating to disease prevention and health promotion.
  • FS 515 – Food Fermentations:  Microbiology and Technology (pending Senate approval) Credits 3 | Fundamental understanding of food fermentation science and technology knowledge and principles; application of scientific knowledge to assess and solve food fermentation science and technology problems.
  • FS 516 – Food Laws Credits  2 | Become familiar with government statutes and regulations that contribute to a safe, nutritious, and wholesome food supply. Understand more about the law and the US legal system relevant to the regulation of the manufacture and sale of food and supplements, including jurisdictional issues, administrative law, and tort, contract, corporate, environmental, labor, and criminal law issues.
  • FS 531 – Advanced Food Quality and Safety Credits 3 | Analysis of the safety, regulation, protection, and quality of processed food products and their manufacturing environment.
    • Advanced topics related to food safety and quality including current issues with quality management, regulatory compliance and the mitigation threats and hazards to the food supply including economic adulteration, allergens and intentional contamination.  Students will develop a HACCP based food protection plan using SQF standards.  Impacts of recent regulations, such as the Food Safety and Modernization Act of 2011 on food production and distribution will be discussed.
  • FS 536 – Principles of Sustainability Credits 3 |  Presented as online doculectures, covering topics such as: Origins of Sustainability, Standards of Sustainability, Culture of Waste, Built Environment, Industrial Sustainability, Energy Sustainability, Water Resources, Measuring Sustainability, Sustainable Impact Assessment, and Our Sustainable Future. Readings and homework are assigned with each topic. Learning assessment will be from homework, exams and written papers. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Additional work is required for graduate credit. [UI Coop Course]
    • Presented as online doculectures, covering topics such as: Origins of Sustainability, Standards of Sustainability, Culture of Waste, Built Environment, Industrial Sustainability, Energy Sustainability, Water Resources, Measuring Sustainability, Sustainable Impact Assessment, and Our Sustainable Future. Readings and homework are assigned with each topic. Learning assessment will be from homework, exams and written papers. Additional work is required for graduate credit.
  • FS 564 – Food Toxicology Credits 3 | Prerequisites: MMBB 300 (Survey of Biochemistry) or MMBB 380 (Introductory Biochemistry).  General principles of toxicologic evaluation of chemicals, which intentionally or unintentionally enter the food chain. Toxicology of food additives, colors, preservatives, drugs, pesticides and natural toxins in foods and risk characterization. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Additional projects/assignments required for graduate credit. [UI Coop Course]
    • Food toxicology is the study of the nature, properties, effects, and detection of toxic substances in food or food animal feed and their disease manifestation in humans. This course will provide a general review of toxicology related to food and the human food chain. Fundamental concepts will be covered including dose‐response relationships, absorption of toxicants, distribution and storage of toxicants, biotransformation and elimination of toxicants, target organ toxicity, teratogenesis, mutagenesis, carcinogenesis, food allergy, and risk assessment. The course will examine chemicals of food interest, such as food additives, natural products, mycotoxins, and pesticides, and how they are tested and regulated. We will critically review case studies and special topics.
  • FS 575 Food Quality Management Credits 3 | Recommended Preparation: FS 302; FS 303; STAT 212. Apply modern statistical methods for quality control and improvement of biomanufactured goods. This course is designed to expose the student to principles of statistical process control while providing a basis of application in a variety of situations and systems. [UI Coop Course]

Horticulture

  • HORT – 350 Food Systems in Western Washington Credits:  3 | Course Prerequisite: CROP SCI/HORT 102; ECONS 101; SOIL SCI 201. Introduction to local and regional food systems unique to western Washington with an emphasis on the farm-to-table processes of foods and beverages. (Course offered as HORT 350, AFS 350).
  • HORT 480 – Plant Genomics and Biotechnology Credits 3 | Prerequisites: BIOLOGY 420 Advanced concepts in plant genomics and biotechnology with emphasis on approaches, techniques, and application. (Crosslisted course offered as HORT 480 and CROP SCI 480). Recommended preparation: MBIOS 301 or CROP SCI 445.
    • The goal of Plant Genomics and Biotechnology is to develop an understanding of the genetics, genomics, and biotechnology of horticultural crop plants, and the ways in which this information can be utilized for crop improvement. This will be accomplished through a survey of plant genomics and biotechnology, along with the investigation of current methods, approaches and techniques. The course will be comprised of reading assignments, online quiz and threaded class discussions. It is expected that students registering for this course have an understanding of the basics of plant physiology and molecular biology.

Human Development

  • H_D – 505 Developing Effective Leadership:  Tidal Leadership  Credits:  2 | HD505 is a leadership course that uses engagement and reflection to support you with creating and implementing a personalized value-based leadership platform.  We frame our approach to leadership as one that promotes positive human development where the skills and tools learned in the course are integrated and modeled for others in both professional and personal contexts.  The intention of this course is to provide you with opportunities to acquire “beyond the discipline” skills that are essential for success in the work place.  We recognize that tremendous amounts of emphasis are placed on training you to be experts in the theoretical and mechanical aspects of your area of expertise.  This course shifts the focus from what you are to who you are and how you build effective working relationships with people regardless of your professional title.  We explore leadership from a different perspective, one that ebbs and flows in a synergistic, powerful way that positively influences the surrounding environment.  Effective leaders don’t fit a mold, but they do tend to share common traits, including a remarkable awareness of themselves and their surroundings, an ability to influence others, and a propensity for making values-based decisions.  This course will help you develop these attributes and more as you build your own personal playbook for becoming an effective leader

Natural Resource Sciences

  • NATRS – 550 Conservation Biology Credits 3 | Patterns of biological diversity, factors producing changes in diversity, values of diversity, management principles applied to small populations, protected areas, landscape linkages, biotic integrity, restoration, legal issues and funding sources. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Graduate-level counterpart of NATRS 450; additional requirements. Credit not granted for both NATRS 450 and 550.
    • Conservation Biology is a writing-in-the-major (M) course that is appropriate for advanced students in both the biological and social sciences.  While no formal pre-requisites (other than junior or senior standing) have been listed for this course because of its inherent interdisciplinary nature, I assume that students will have at least a general university science background (e.g., general biology, and preferably, some additional supporting science coursework in other areas such as agriculture, biology, ecology, botany, environmental science, horticulture, landscape architecture, natural resources, social science, or zoology).

Philosophy

  • PHIL 530 – Bioethics Credits 2 | Professional ethics for scientists; ethical implications of new technologies; obligations to human and non-human research subjects. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.
    • This course will have students explore a variety of issues related to the ethics of research in and the use of biotechnology, the ethics of science more generally, and research ethics. We will begin by considering why scientists should have an interest in the ethical dynamics of their research and its application. We will also discuss a variety of approaches to ethics, as well as political and philosophical implications of scientific research. The bulk of the course will be devoted to looking at particular issues in bioethics, including the use of human research subjects, ethical issues in biomedicine and the pharmaceutical industry, stem cells and human cloning, reproductive and genetic issues, neuroethics, the use of animals in research, and plant biotechnologies. We will also cover the responsible conduct of research, as required by various government funding agencies.

Plant Pathology

  • PL P 501 – Biology and Control of Plant Diseases Credits 3 (2-3) | Introduction to the biology and control of plant diseases covering disorders caused by fungi, viruses, bacteria, and nematodes.
    • The course introduces concepts regarding the biology and control of plant diseases, covering disorders caused by fungi, viruses, bacteria, and nematodes, as well as the role of environmental factors (including temperature, moisture and others) in contributing to the development of epidemics. Upon completion students will be able to find, interpret, and use scientific literature on plant diseases and to understand the use of a variety of control strategies suitable for use by both traditional and organic growers.

Soil Science

  • SOIL_SCI 101 – Organic Gardening and Farming Credits 3 | Prerequisites: none Principles and production practices of organic gardening and farming. Field trip required. Cooperative course taught by WSU, open to UI students (AG 101).  Supporting coursework; will not count toward MS degree requirements.
    • The goal of Soil Science 101 Organic Gardening and Farming is to provide you with an introduction to the field of organic agriculture and the basic principles and production practices involved. Topics covered will include an introduction to the growing literature on organic farming, the issue of sustainability, soil quality in terms of its physical, chemical, and biological characteristics, organic soil fertility, basic plant botany and plant propagation techniques, weed and pest management, food health and safety, general organic garden and farm planning and organic certification requirements. We will also aim to foster critical thinking, media use and writing skills as we explore some of the rhetoric used in the ongoing organic agriculture debate.
  • SOIL_SCI 201 -Soil: A Living System [BSCI] Credits 3 | Biological, chemical, and physical properties of soils; fundamentals of soil ecology, soil-water-plant relations, soil fertility , and soil genesis. Supporting coursework; will not count toward MS degree requirements.
    • The goal of Soil Science 201, Soils: A Living System, is to develop a general understanding of the science of soils and to give students an appreciation of what is underneath almost every footstep that a person takes. By the end of the semester you will have been introduced to the concept of soil formation, morphology and classification as well as soil biological, chemical, and physical processes. We will also cover the soil as a supplier of water and nutrients to plants, the role of soil as a host to an array of living organisms, how we manage these aspects of soil, as well as how natural and imposed events can degrade soils. This will be done through a combination of on-line lectures, individual and group activities, threaded discussions, and chats. In this class you will not only get to learn, you will be able to get your hands dirty!
  • SOIL_SCI 302 – [M] Introduction to Agroecology Credits 3 | Prerequisites: SoilS 201 Agroecological crop production through case study analyses and applications of ecological principles in traditional and modern farming systems. (Crosslisted course offered as SOIL SCI 302, AFS 302). Recommended preparation: SOILS SCI 201
    • This course is designed as an introductory agroecology course. It will blend basic principles of ecology (including species interactions, population dynamics, disturbance, succession, natural selection, genetic and species diversity and stability, etc.) with current issues in agricultural systems (including soil quality, weed control, pest and disease management, genetic diversity, etc.). Case studies will focus on modern and traditional farming systems where the use of agroecological concepts and practices has improved the overall economic, social, and environmental sustainability of these farming systems. Agroecological design will be addressed in relationship to potential improvements in the sustainability of many of our current methods of agricultural production.
  • SOIL_SCI 360 – [I] World Agricultural Systems Credits 3 | Prerequisites: Two semesters physical or biological sciences. Study of agro-environmental characteristics of world agriculture; historical and contemporary features of world food production. (Crosslisted course offered as CROP SCI 360, SOIL SCI 360).
    • This is an upper-level survey course exploring the interactions between agriculture and human societies (past and present). It includes historical discussions of the world’s major food crops and farming methods, current agricultural systems on our planet, the role that climate and soils play in agricultural systems, and how agriculture and the rest of our environment interact. We also try to connect all of this to each of our lives today. Other than expecting some basic science background (completion of two semesters in either college level physical or biological sciences), the course is geared to ALL folks, both those with and without agriculture or science backgrounds.
  • SOIL_SCI 368 – Introduction to Geographic Information Systems Credits 3 | Prerequisites: 3 credits in the UCORE category Sciences Introduction to geographic information systems applied to landscape data; geographic coordinate systems and projections, make maps and use geodatabases.
    • Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are tools that allow you to visually explore and analyze the mountains of data that surround us. A GIS can process the geospatial information found in most data sets, and allow you to answer questions and make decisions that would be difficult to answer with a traditional spreadsheet or database: Where is this? What is it next to? How is it related to what is over there? How do I get there? In this class you will learn to create maps that communicate information to different audiences, and learn how to analyze data from a spatial perspective. You will get to use the leading commercial GIS software package, ArcGIS to accomplish these tasks.
  •  SOIL_SCI 374 – Remote Sensing and Airphoto Interpretation Credits 3 |
    • Course Prerequisite: 3 credits of [B], [BSCI], [P], or [PSCI] GER or UCORE categories. Physical basis of remote sensing, fundamentals of aerial photography and image analysis applied to agriculture, forestry, wildland management problems.
  • SOIL_SCI 441 – Soil Fertility Credits: 3 | Prerequisites Soil_Sci 201 Nutrient management impacts on crop productivity, soil and water quality; mineral requirements; soil testing; plant analysis; inorganic and organic fertilizers.
    • Soil Fertility (SOILS 441) is an advanced course that examines the basic stuff of life: mineral nutrients and the systems that influence nutrient cycling and availability to plants, including chemical and biological transformations and reactions in soils that affect the fate of organic and inorganic materials added to the soil-plant system. We will apply our knowledge of these processes to better our understanding of nutrient management impacts on crop productivity, human health and soil/water quality. We will develop skills in soil fertility evaluation and nutrient management planning.
  • SOIL_SCI 478 Advanced Organic Farming and Gardening Credits 2 Course Prerequisite: SOIL SCI 101. Advanced training in organic certification and planning for organic farming. Typically offered: Spring
  • SOIL_SCI 479 Organic Farm and Garden Field Management Credits 2 Course Prerequisite: SOIL SCI 478. Advanced training in production management for organic farms and gardens. Typically offered: Summer and Fall
  • SOIL_SCI 547 – Soil Fertility Management Credits 3 | Prerequisites: Soil_Sci 441Philosophy of fertilizer recommendations based on soil and plant tissue testing; principles of fertilizer manufacture, placement and use.
    • The goal of Soil Science 547 Soil Fertility Management is to develop an in-depth understanding of the role fertilizers play in agricultural production systems. To develop an appreciation of the need for soil fertility management, we will explore both the soils ability to supply nutrients as well as plant nutrient demand. In addition, we will explore environmental factors that govern nutrient supply and uptake. To supplement our on-line activities, students will be asked to identify a soil testing lab near them to visit in person and report about to discuss similarities and differences later during the semester. Next, we will start from the ground up and explore fertilizer mining and manufacturing procedures for phosphorus and potassium. To develop an in-depth understanding of current issues related to fertilizer availability and usage, we will conduct online discussions of pertinent current issues. Using the book “The Alchemy of Air” we will explore the history and development of modern nitrogen fertilizers and discuss agricultural, social, and environmental related issues. Finally, to expand our explorations of nutrients and soil amendments, each student will chose an element from a provided list and prepare information about the element. Students will develop a summary presentation of information using their preferred choice of media and lead an on-line discussion to cover the topic.
  • SOIL_SCI 568 – Introduction to Geographic Information Systems Credits 4 (w/lab)
    • Geographic information systems applied to analysis of landscape data; maps, geographic coordinate systems and projections, geodatabases.

Statistics

  • STAT 412 – Statistical Methods in Research I REQUIRED CORE COURSE(Non-Thesis Option) Credits 3 | Prerequisites: Stat 212, Math 140, 171, 202, or graduate standing. Intermediate statistical methods, design and analysis of research studies: completely randomized and randomized block designs, multiple regression, categorical data analysis. Cooperative course taught by WSU, open to UI students (STAT 412).
    • This course will introduce you to the concepts and methods involved in the process of drawing meaningful conclusions based on observation and experimentation. After a brief review of descriptive techniques, basic concepts of probability, and computer methods we will focus on collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. By the end of the semester, you will be able to gather, analyze, and interpret data, draw meaningful conclusions, discuss the reliability of your conclusions and the assumptions upon which your conclusions are based.
  • STAT 512 – Statistical Methods in Research II REQUIRED CORE COURSE(Thesis Option) Credits 3 (2-2) | Prerequisites: Stat 412 or equivalent. Analysis and interpretation of designed experiments: CRD, RCBD, spit-plot and repeated measures, multiple comparisons, multiple regression modeling, validation of assumptions.
    • This course will introduce you to the concepts and methods involved in designing and analyzing scientific studies. After a brief review of descriptive and inferential statistical techniques, we will focus on collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data resulting from designed experiments. By the end of the semester, you will be able to design scientific experiments, gather, analyze, and interpret data, draw meaningful conclusions, discuss the reliability of your conclusions and the assumptions upon which your conclusions are based.

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WSU and the University of Idaho (UI), both land-grant institutions and closely located (8 miles apart) on the WA/ID border, have a rich history in cooperative education. The WSU/UI cooperative course agreement allows students at either institution to enroll in designated courses at the other institution. An informative explanation of the entire process for enrolling in UI cooperative course is provided above.

 

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